Opening Up The Options

"Autism Awareness Month Brings New Hope"

Reprinted from The Advocate, regarding Autism Spectrum Disorders, England

SHEFFIELD - April is National Autism Awareness Month. One in 500 children are affected by autism and related disorders, impacting over 400,000 families in the U.S. alone. Autism is the third most prevalent developmental disorder in the world. Because it is considered to be a lifelong condition, such a diagnosis leaves many parents with little hope for their children's future improvement or recovery.

Since 1983, The Son-Rise Program® at the Autism Treatment Center of America™ has provided innovative training programs designed to help families and caregivers enable their children to dramatically improve in all areas of learning, development, communication and skill acquisition.

While Raun K. Kaufman has been working in the field with families, children, and professionals for several years, he brings a unique perspective and qualification to the world of autism treatment as a person who has fully recovered from autism. At 18 months, Mr. Kaufman was diagnosed with severe autism and given no hope of recovery. His parents, authors and teachers Barry Neil Kaufman and Samahria

Kaufman, developed a special child-centered program for their son, enabling him to emerge without any trace of his former condition. His story was recounted in the book Son-Rise: The Miracle Continues, by Barry Neil Kaufman, and was the subject of an award-winning NBC-TV movie. The young Kaufman is now an international lecturer, writer and teacher for The Son-Rise Program® at The Autism Treatment Center of America™ in Sheffield, Mass.

Kaufman will be presenting his lecture, "Practical Strategies for Autism and PDD," at Boston University on April II, 2001, from 6:30-9:3Opm. The in-depth lecture will outline and explain The Son-Rise Program®'s unique tools and principles, which can be immediately implemented. The material is designed for parents and professionals caring for children challenged by autism, Autism Spectrum Disorders, PDD, and other related developmental challenges, as well as educators and students studying or working with children with special needs.

Kaufman will also be speaking at the Autism Awareness Conference and Rally in Washington, D.C. sponsored by Unlocking Autism on April 26th and 27th.

"People have accused us of advocating false hope, but hope can never be bad or wrong or inappropriate," says Kaufman. "When I was diagnosed with severe autism, my parents decided to see possibilities where others saw none, and it was this perspective that enabled my complete recovery. At the Autism Treatment Center of America™, we don't believe you should ever have to apologize for giving your child a chance. Hope leads to action, and without action, none of these children can be helped."